Home Publications Optical Calcium Imaging Using DNA-Encoded Fluorescence Sensors in Transgenic Fruit Flies, Drosophila melanogaster
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Shubham Dipt, Thomas Riemensperger, and André Fiala (2014)

Optical Calcium Imaging Using DNA-Encoded Fluorescence Sensors in Transgenic Fruit Flies, Drosophila melanogaster

Methods in Molecular Biology 1071:195-206.  (export entry)


The invention of protein-based fl uorescent biosensors has paved the way to target specifi c cells with these probes and visualize intracellular processes not only in isolated cells or tissue cultures but also in transgenic animals. In particular, DNA-encoded fl uorescence proteins sensitive to Ca 2+ ions are often used to monitor changes in intracellular Ca 2+ concentrations. This is of particular relevance in neuroscience since the dynamics of intracellular Ca 2+ concentrations represents a faithful correlate for neuronal activity, and optical Ca 2+ imaging is commonly used to monitor spatiotemporal activity across populations of neurons. In this respect Drosophila provides a favorable model organism due to the sophisticated genetic tools that facilitate the targeted expression of fl uorescent Ca 2+ sensor proteins. Here we describe how optical Ca 2+ imaging of neuronal activity in the Drosophila brain can be carried out in vivo using two-photon microscopy. We exemplify this technique by describing how to monitor odor-evoked Ca 2+ dynamics in the primary olfactory center of the Drosophila brain.
doi: 10.1007/978-1-62703-622-1_15