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Cooperation partners of this group

Cooperation partners of this group sorted by name.

Dr. Bernd Porr

Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Glasgow, Scotland, UK.
Computational Neuroscience

This has been since years (about 1995) our most important and most productive cooperation. Most ideas of the recent years have been developed together with Bernd, who takes a great share in our existing research program. We focus here on the theory of correlation based learning and, more recently, its influence on the limbic system.



Prof. Norbert Krüger

The Maersk Institute, South Danish University, Odense, Danmark
Computational Neuroscience

This intense cooperation started in 2001 and concerns the development of an advanced computer vision system for the use in different real-time tasks (like robotics).



Prof. Ausra Saudargiene

Dept. of Informatics, Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania.
Computational Neuroscience

This cooperation began in 2002 and addresses issues of the biophysics of synaptic plasticity. Minija Tamosiunaite is also involved in this.



Prof. Minija Taminosiunaite

Dept. of Informatics, Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania.
Computational Neuroscience

This cooperation started in 2004 and addresses the question how a sequence of hippocampal place fields can be used for goal-directed navigation.



Dr. Paul Dudchenko, Dr. Jamie Ainge

Dept. of Psychology, University of Stirling, Scotland, UK.
Computational Neuroscience

This experimental cooperation started in 2005 focuses on the question how hippocampal place fields encode the sequencing of actions.



Dr. Andre Seyfarth and Dr. Zully Ritter

University of Jena
Computational Neuroscience

This cooperation started in 2006 on the development of an advanced, adaptive muscle model for robot actuation.



Prof. Carme Torras

CSIC, Barcelona, Spain
Computational Neuroscience

This cooperation has started in 2006 conjunction with the PACO-PLUS project and concerns the development of advanced decision-making and planning algorithms.



Prof. Fred Wolf and Prof. Holger Schanz

MPI Dyn. & Self-Org., Göttingen
Computational Neuroscience

This cooperation has started in 2006 in order to address issues of how to control the dynamics of large, adaptive chaotic neuronal systems.